qualitative

ELA: Why Lexile Scores Don’t Tell the Whole Story

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Last week I provided teachers with updated Lexile Ranges from Appdenix A of the Common Core State Standards. Read on to see how teachers must also take in consideration more qualitative measures when determining which books to use in the classroom.

manpotteralexanderCan you identify the words in this word cloud taken from Ernest Hemingway’s The Old Man and the Sea? What about those from Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows by J.K. Rowling? Or even from Judith Viorst’s Alexander and the Terrible, Horrible, No Good, Very Bad Day?

On first glance, either can I! The reason? All three books scored between 940L-980L using the online Lexile Text Analyzer  tool. This would place all three books firmly in the 4th-5th grade reading range.  Even more surprising? The simple board book The Wee Little Woman  by Byron Barton  scores a 1300L using the same set of metrics due to the repeated use of the slightly archaic word “wee.”

In a nutshell, these examples remind us that other, more qualitative, measures must be taken into consideration when selecting high-quality literature for students. While Lexile scores are a quick and dirty measure of readability, teachers still need to carefully consider the text structure and language features of each text as well as visual supports such as illustrations, the levels of meaning and purpose of the selected text, and the prior knowledge students need to have to understand the text.

The non-profit Aspen Institute has created a user-friendly Text Complexity Analysis Worksheet for classroom teachers to use when evaluating the reading level of student materials. This is an excellent collaboration tool for both elementary and secondary teachers. Please feel free to contact me if you’d like me to show your grade level team or department how to use this worksheet.

Thanks to Lakeland School District teacher Katie Graupman for sharing this resource at a recent Region 1 CORE workshop! jennifer-signature